GET BREAKING NEWS IN YOUR BROWSER. CLICK HERE TO TURN ON NOTIFICATIONS.

X

Bolder Boulder remains hopeful for Labor Day event

Race director continues to monitor landscape of COVID-19 pandemic

Organizers announced Monday the 2020 Bolder Boulder is postponed over concerns about the new coronavirus. (Jeremy Papasso / Staff Photographer)

For the past two months, Cliff Bosley and Bolder Boulder organizers have set their sights on a rescheduled Labor Day race.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to keep sports and mass gatherings on the shelf, Bosley remains hopeful that the 42nd running of the Bolder Boulder 10K will take place this year.

“We continue to plan and prepare, just knowing that either way we’ve got to be ready,” said Bosley, the Bolder Boulder race director. “We’re preparing to be able to stage what we do, knowing the landscape can change.”

The landscape has already caused a major change for the Bolder Boulder, which has become one of the great Memorial Day traditions in the United States. On March 16, as concerns over the spread of the coronavirus were growing, the Bolder Boulder postponed its May 25 race.

“For me it’s a little bit weird because all I’ve ever known since sixth grade was if it’s Memorial Day, it’s the Bolder Boulder and someone is running,” said Bosley, whose father, Steve, founded the race.

As of now, the Bolder Boulder is scheduled for Monday, Sept. 7, and Bosley said the organization is working as usual to get ready for the event.

“We’re always working,” he said. “The discipline for us is probably just growing up steeped in the Boy Scouts to be prepared. We have a very small and very engaged and I would say a very disciplined team. Planning and preparing, it still is very constructive for our organization.”

The Bolder Boulder, which features nearly 50,000 runners each year and concludes with the finish line in the University of Colorado’s Folsom Field, has become a big part of the local community and the running world.

Bosley recognizes the importance of the race to those involved and those who look forward to it every year, but said he and the Bolder Boulder staff are also mindful of the health and safety of the city, state and the world.

“The Bolder Boulder is a unique and maybe important connecting point in the community but it’s secondary to the community being back on line and being back functioning and back to work and back to school,” Bosley said.

“What may impact the cities or universities; or school programs; or students being back at school is going to directly relate to us.”

Ultimately, the decision to run or not could be out of Bosley’s hands if local, state or federal government has a ban on mass gatherings into the fall. Bosley added, however, that race prep typically ramps up about 100 days before the event – which would be late May/early June – so there will be some sense of urgency.

“Much of what we get to do and have the opportunity to do is really going to be contingent on the landscape,” Bosley said. “We’re standing patiently and we’re watching and monitoring every conversation and at the same time the dual discipline of we’re still going to work and prepare because at some point in time we’re going to put on a race.”

Bosley is hopeful that point in time can still be in 2020.

“Long term, running the race is about what’s best for the community and when it’s best for the community and for our partners – the University of Colorado and the city of Boulder,” he said. “If it’s good for those folks, then it will be good for our participants. We’re purposeful about what we get to do and hopeful about when we get to do it.”