Trevor Carver is perhaps best-known in Monarch High football annals for his school-record interception return, an 82-yarder for a score in a playoff game against Durango last fall.

And if everything goes well at the college level, that play might well remain the most storied of his career.

The Coyotes senior committed this week to join the Colorado Buffaloes as a preferred walkon, but not at cornerback. He'll play long-snapper -- a position that generally gains little notoriety unless something goes horribly wrong but one at which he quietly excelled during high school.

The 6-foot, 180-pound Carver, whose father Scott played tight end at Michigan State, had been sitting on a similar offer from the Utah Utes for about a month before getting word from CU coaches that they would have a spot for him.

Golden’s #6, Nick Mattson goes up for a pass as Monarch’s #21, Trevor Carver attempts to intercept.Photo by: Jonathan Castner
Golden's #6, Nick Mattson goes up for a pass as Monarch's #21, Trevor Carver attempts to intercept. Photo by: Jonathan Castner ( Jonathan Castner )

"I just felt a little more comfortable (at Colorado)," Trevor Carver said Friday. "I'm very excited."

Carver said he had opportunities to play cornerback at a couple of Division-III schools in California, but had long ago set his heart on playing Division-I football. And long-snapping, which he learned from his father in pee-wee football, ended up being his ticket.

"Ever since then, I've been long-snapping and been pretty good at it," Carver said.

As a preferred walkon, Carver will have a spot on the 105-man roster when fall camp begins in August rather than having to wait until classes start to join the squad.

He joins a CU program that lists returning starter Ryan Iverson, a junior-to-be, ahead of Fairview grad Keegan LaMar, a redshirt freshman, on the post-spring depth chart.


Advertisement

"We sent film of his snaps, and they like what they saw, with his athleticism for punt team especially," Monarch coach Phil Bravo said. "It's one of those positions that can make or break a game."