Before he ever hoists a critical jumper, executes a nifty pass, or puts together a timely defensive stop for the Colorado Buffaloes men's basketball team, Bryce Peters is focused on overcoming some far more mundane obstacles at his new home.

For the time being, Peters will be happy if he can simply get to his classes on time.

"Right now I'm just trying to find my way around," Peters said. "Every building here looks exactly alike."

Peters and the rest of CU's 2016 recruiting class — Deleon Brown, Lucas Siewert and Dallas Walton — arrived on campus this week to begin summer courses and take part in their first unofficial workouts with their new teammates.

While Siewert is ticketed for a backup role in the frontcourt, and the 7-foot Walton faces a possible redshirt season, Peters and Brown are 6-foot-4 guards with similar skills who are expected to make an immediate impact — an expectation that was heightened last fall when head coach Tad Boyle said both players have the potential to become multiple-year starters.

Peters hails from a family with a rich basketball pedigree. He has two older brothers who played at Azusa Pacific, and his mother is a decorated small college coach. Peters also has two uncles with impressive basketball resumes — Cameron Murray was a standout guard at Louisville, and Tracy Murray starred at UCLA before embarking on a 12-year NBA career.


Peters says he received 27 scholarship offers but immediately eliminated every offer from a California school, citing a desire to spread his wings from his hometown of La Puente. Yet is was the influence of a certain former CU star who grew up nearby, Spencer Dinwiddie, who helped steer Peters toward Boulder.

"I kind of grew up with Spencer Dinwiddie and we both shared a coach," Peters said. "I just thought (CU) would be a great fit because it's not one of those Kentucky-type schools, but they definitely don't stink either."

Having signed together while earning early simultaneous praise from Boyle, it already feels as if Peters and Brown are symbiotically linked. That sense has extended to their first few days on campus, as Brown is beginning the same two classes as Peters while helping his new teammate navigate that campus maze of similar structures.

Brown arrives from Grand Rapids, Mich., but he already has endured the adjustment to life away from home, having spent one post-high school year at Brewster Academy in New Hampshire. Not only did the prep school allow Brown to grow accustomed to dorm life, but he competed against a stepping-stone version of the sort of players he soon will face in the Pac-12 Conference.

"I feel like it was great — you're already flying away from home and getting accustomed to classes and dorms," Brown said. "The on-the-court part, you're playing against two or three Division I guys every game. That definitely helped me prepare in the weight room and on the court as far as being aggressive and being more consistent in knocking down my shot."

Pat Rooney: or